Sibutramine Uses, Side Effects & Warnings

What is sibutramine?


Sibutramine was withdrawn from the U.S. market in October 2010.

Sibutramine affects chemicals in the brain that affect weight maintenance.

Sibutramine is used together with diet and exercise to treat obesity that may be related to diabetes, high cholesterol, or high blood pressure. 


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Sibutramine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.




What is the most important information I should know about sibutramine?

Sibutramine was withdrawn from the U.S. market in October 2010.

Do not use sibutramine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. Serious, life threatening side effects can occur if you use sibutramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

You should not take sibutramine if you are allergic to it, or if you have severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure, an eating disorder (anorexia or bulimia), if you are taking stimulant diet pills, or if you have a history of coronary artery disease, stroke, or heart disease.

Before taking sibutramine, tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, high blood pressure, liver or kidney disease, depression, underactive thyroid, seizures, a bleeding disorder, a history of gallstones, or if you are older than 65 or younger than 16.

Tell your doctor about all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, especially antidepressants, cold or allergy medication, narcotic pain medicine, or migraine headache medicines.

Tell your doctor if you do not lose at least 4 pounds after taking the medication for 4 weeks along with a low calorie diet.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking sibutramine?

Do not use sibutramine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. Serious, life threatening side effects can occur if you use sibutramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to sibutramine, or if you have:

severe or uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure);

an eating disorder (anorexia or bulimia);

a history of coronary artery disease (atherosclerosis);

a history of heart disease (congestive heart failure, heart rhythm disorder);

a history of heart attack or stroke; or

if you are taking stimulant diet pills.



If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a sibutramine dose adjustment or special tests:

glaucoma;

high blood pressure;

liver disease;

kidney disease;

depression;

underactive thyroid;

epilepsy or seizure disorder;

a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;

a history of gallstones; or

if you are older than 65 or younger than 16.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether sibutramine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using sibutramine.

It is not known whether sibutramine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give this medication to anyone younger than 16 years old.

How should I take sibutramine?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Sibutramine is usually taken once daily. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Sibutramine can be taken with or without food.

You should lose at least 4 pounds during the first 4 weeks of taking sibutramine and eating a low calorie diet. Tell your doctor if you do not lose at least 4 pounds after taking the medication for 4 weeks.

Your blood pressure and pulse will need to be checked often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Sibutramine should not be taken for longer than 2 years.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Do not share sibutramine with another person. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.


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